March College Checklist for Juniors

From The Choice….”This is the part of your college search that does not have a lot of specific deadlines. It does, however, have a lot of things you need to do to stay on track and set yourself up for the best experience.” Check out the checklist here. But….

I would also add that if you have not done so already, now is the time to solidify your summer plans. Many formal programs (academic and otherwise) are still accepting applications, so if this is on your radar act now. Otherwise, begin thinking about internship opportunities, taking classes in your field of interest, working or volunteering. If you wait until May or June, many opportunities will be long gone. Contact us for more information on summer planning and opportunities to take advantage of during this time!

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Inside the Admissons Process

Seth Allen, dean of admission and financial aid at Grinnell College, answers questions from a TODAY producer about what really goes on when admissions officers decide applicants’ fate in this video/article. I am not surprised that a good deal of my own experience and knowledge is mirrored and supported in Mr. Allen’s commentary. A helpful read.

High School Junior January-June Checklist

Spring of Junior year is a crucial time. Getting started on the application and admissions process now is a must-do. Check out this January-June checklist from Marjorie Hansen Schaevitz’s HuffPost blog for a more in depth look at what you should be doing now and over the next five months.

More Application Tips!

Via Marjorie Hansen Shaevitz @HuffPost:

Right about now, every college bound high school senior is doing (or should be doing) the same thing: filling out college applications. While each phase of the college admissions process is important, nothing is more important than completing the applications. When all is said and done, the best case for colleges admitting you is offering them a stellar application that articulates who you are as a student and person.

Read the rest of the article to learn about seven things you can do to make sure your application stands out from the crowd.

November Checklist: Seniors

Assess Your Progress Toward a Strong Finish

Finish your first semester on a strong note in the classroom. Colleges know that you often start your academic career at their institution in the same way you finished at your high school.

You should also continue to show teachers and other adults in your life that you make wise choices in and out of school and demonstrate that you are ready for the independence that you will have as a college student.

Next, place yourself into one of the following two categories:

Not There Yet: You have procrastinated or need more time to prove yourself to colleges; it is important to recognize that college admission is within your reach.

In the Waiting Room: You have written and rewritten essays, requested transcripts and teacher recommendations, sent scores and perhaps completed your interviews.


Checklist for Seniors Who Are ‘Not There Yet’

It’s not too late, and you’re not alone. Students move through this process at different speeds, and there is not one definitive deadline for all colleges.

Please note that the only definitive deadlines are for financial aid, and you and your parents must meet these deadlines to qualify for money. If you put yourself in the camp of “not there yet,” please follow these basic instructions to complete the process:

Take Standardized Tests, Before It’s Too Late

Register for the SAT or ACT before the late registration deadline passes. (Please note that some SAT test dates and deadlines have changed for students in areas affected by Hurricane Sandy.)

Request Supplemental Materials for Your Application

Request teacher recommendations and transcripts from your counselor as soon as possible. Most schools require three to four weeks advance notice to process these materials.

Complete Your College Applications

Nearly 500 colleges and universities accept the Common Application, which students can use to apply to a number of colleges and universities. You may also use your prospective college’s online application by going directly to the school’s Web site.

If you need help paying for applications or standardized test registration fees, ask your school counselor if your family qualifies for fee waivers.


Checklist for Seniors ‘In the Waiting Room’

You have handled the process part of the college application very well, which in so many ways shows that you are ready for the independence you will have next year. Take a moment to celebrate the work you’ve done. This is a milestone, and you should be proud of yourself.

If you’ve already hit the submit button and applications are out of your hands, this time can be wrought with anxiety as you wait to hear your fate. No matter how much you want to know the answer, you cannot speed up time; you will not know until the college releases their decisions. Some things to consider:

Keep Your Options Open

It’s not too late to make last-minute additions and revisit and reaffirm the choices you’ve made. Now is the time to make sure you have applied to an appropriate list of colleges that will afford you choice.

Prepare Next Steps After Early Decision

If you have applied under an early decision plan, use the next few weeks to work on the applications you will file if you are deferred or denied in the early decision round. Do not submit these applications yet (you do not want to pay the fees at this point) but have them ready to go. Do not lose time because of poor planning.

Mind the Deadlines

Be aware that some colleges use Jan. 1 as a deadline. If fireworks are bringing in the New Year outside, it is really too late to be working on these applications.

Follow Up With Teachers and Counselors

Here’s a well-kept secret: teachers and counselors like school vacations, too. Most of them have been working tirelessly all semester to support your application process. Let them know before winter break if you have additional applications you’d like to submit.

Now is also a great time to thank your teachers for their support. A kind word or a note goes a long way.

Source.

October Checklist: Juniors

If the warm, bright start of your academic year has chilled and faded into a drudgery of routines and deadlines, sapping the enthusiasm and excitement you felt at the beginning of the year, then find ways to combat your flagging motivation and develop strategies to maximize your performance.

Read the full article and checklist here.